Google’s Girl is Set to Make Management Moves at Yahoo!

The chief executive officer of any organization holds the highest responsibility in communicating, decision making, leading and managing. Appointing a new CEO can be an exciting time for a company, but needless to say, it can also present a huge challenge.

Case in point, Yahoo!. The last five years have been a tumultuous time for the company, having gone through five CEOs in as many years.

The question that naturally follows is simple: what’s wrong? The consistent reorganization of leadership is largely what has gone wrong. The last CEO got fired for the educational background fib on his resume, while the one before that was fired for her inability to increase value and effectively lead. Prior to that, the co-founder of Yahoo! stepped down from his role as the CEO and earlier this year, resigned from Yahoo’s board of directors. The news just keeps rolling in.

Given this turmoil, it would be no surprise if employee engagement levels at Yahoo! have decreased as a result, which can certainly explain the decrease in profits. Studies in employee research have highlighted leadership as a key driver in employee engagement levels at organizations. Leaders need to be inspiring, visible and open. The bad news is that doesn’t seem to be the case at Yahoo! presently. The good news is there are high hopes out there for the company’s newest CEO, former Google Vice President, Marissa Mayer.

With the hiring of Mayer, Yahoo is looking for stability. Mayer, has cracked many glass ceilings in her (still young) lifetime, but made the ultimate shatter once she accepted the role CEO just last week. She was Google’s 20themployee upon her graduation from Stanford and she’s been on an admirable rise to success ever since then. She’s played a crucial role in Google’s brand over the years, contributing to the development of some of its most valuable products and features. Her first day at Yahoo! was this past Tuesday.

Not surprisingly, that was also the day online mentions of Mayer reached their peak, exceeding 650,000 conversations across the social universe.

Source: ORC International

The key questions Mayer will probably be tasked with answering early on may focus on attracting new talent, retaining key talent and cutting underperforming workforce. She will need to stabilize the executive leadership team and create a product road map determining what Yahoo! needs to push and what needs to get pulled.

Business Insider has done a lot of digging on Mayer and found that, at Google, she went from managing 250 product managers to supervising about 6,000 contractors and 1,100 managers covering engineering, design, marketing and sales. They’ve also gathered statements from former employees of Mayer, unveiling opinions of her management style as that of “intimidation and humiliation”, “a nightmare”, “workaholic tyranny” and “alienation”. But sources close to Mayer have offset this sentiment by stating how much she’s grown and matured as a leader over the years. On the same token, statements surrounding her unfavorability seem to solidify the reason Yahoo! brought her on board to begin with – she’s super smart and she gets the job done  every time.

Our Social Buzz data here at ORC International shows Ms. Mayer being mentioned every 1.8 seconds this month, with a 78% positive sentiment surrounding her. Many would agree that it was only a matter of time before she would be granted the opportunity to lead a public company and many look forward to reading positive headlines about Yahoo! in the years to come.

Source: ORC International

Tags: , , ,

Categories: Employee Engagement

Author:Tameka Vasquez

Tameka is the Marketing Communications Coordinator at ORC International. ORC International is a leading global market research firm. We specialize in research related to Customer Equity, Employee Engagement, Business & Market Expansion and Product Development & Innovation. Follow us on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook!

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